The role of cognitive, emotional and personality factors in the experience of fatigue in a university and community sample

Maria Kangas*, Guy H. Montgomery

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The aim of this study was to investigate the contribution of cognitive, emotional and personality factors to the experience of fatigue severity in healthy adult individuals. Specifically, the study examined whether fatigue catastrophising and emotional distress mediated the relationships between neuroticism, general irrational and rational thoughts to fatigue severity. One hundred and eighty nine university students and community volunteers completed self-report questionnaires assessing fatigue catastrophising and symptom severity, neuroticism, general rational and irrational thoughts and emotional distress. A series of correlational and path analyses were conducted to test the study hypotheses. Neuroticism and more general negative, irrational cognitions were associated with elevated fatigue catastrophising and fatigue severity, whereas more adaptive, rational cognitions were related to lower fatigue catastrophising and fatigue severity. Both elevated fatigue catastrophising and emotional distress uniquely and simultaneously mediated the relationships between irrational and rational cognitions and neuroticism to fatigue severity. These findings demonstrate that cognitions play a role in fatigue severity. The results have implications in the assessment and treatment of fatigue disturbances in the general community.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-19
Number of pages19
JournalPsychology and Health
Volume26
Issue numberSUPPL. 1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2011

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The role of cognitive, emotional and personality factors in the experience of fatigue in a university and community sample'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this