The role of parental anxiety in the treatment of childhood anxiety

Vanessa E. Cobham*, Susan H. Spence, Mark R. Dadds

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

367 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Sixty-seven children aged 7 to 14 who met diagnostic criteria for an anxiety disorder were assigned to conditions according to parental anxiety level. Within these conditions, children were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 treatments: child-focused cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) or child- focused CBT plus parental anxiety management (CBT + PAM). At posttreatment, results indicated that within the child-anxiety-only condition, 82% of the children in the CBT condition no longer met criteria for an anxiety disorder compared with 80% in the CBT + PAM condition. Within the child + parental anxiety condition, 39% in the CBT condition no longer met criteria compared with 77% in the CBT + PAM condition. At follow-up, these differences were maintained, with some weakening over time. Results were not consistent across outcome measures. The interpretation and potential clinical implications of these findings are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)893-905
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of consulting and clinical psychology
Volume66
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1998
Externally publishedYes

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