The role of teachers’ instrumental and emotional support in students’ academic buoyancy, engagement, and academic skills: a study of high school and elementary school students in different national contexts

Helena Granziera, Gregory Arief D. Liem, Wan Har Chong, Andrew J. Martin*, Rebecca J. Collie, Michelle Bishop, Lauren Tynan

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this investigation of high school students (N = 2510) in Singapore (Study 1) and elementary school students (N = 119) in Australia (Study 2), we examined the role of instrumental and emotional forms of teacher support in students' academic buoyancy and academic outcomes (engagement and academic skills). In both studies, perceived instrumental support (but not perceived emotional support) was positively associated with academic buoyancy (moderate effect size in Study 1, large effect in Study 2). In Study 1, academic buoyancy was positively associated with students' academic engagement (specifically, effort and persistence [large effect], perceived importance of school [moderate effect], and feelings of school belonging [moderate effect]). In Study 2 academic buoyancy was positively associated with gains in students' academic skills and engagement (specifically, class participation [large effect] and future aspirations [large effect]). In both studies, there was tentative support for a mediating role of academic buoyancy linking students' perceived teacher support to academic outcomes.

Original languageEnglish
Article number101619
Pages (from-to)1-14
Number of pages14
JournalLearning and Instruction
Volume80
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2022

Keywords

  • teacher support
  • academic buoyancy
  • engagement
  • motivation
  • achievement

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