The Roles of thought suppression and metacognitive beliefs in proneness to auditory verbal hallucinations in a non-clinical sample

Simon R. Jones, Charles Fernyhough

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

41 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In a non-clinical sample (N = 751), we investigated relations among two subscales (self-reported intrusiveness of unwanted thoughts and thought suppression) of the White Bear Suppression Inventory (WBSI), metacognitive beliefs, and proneness to auditory verbal hallucinations (AVHs). Both subscales of the WBSI were found to be related to AVH-proneness and strongly positively related to metacognitive beliefs about the uncontrollability and danger of thoughts. Regression analyses were used to test models of the relations among AVH-proneness and a range of metacognitive beliefs. When the WBSI subscale relating to the self-reported intrusiveness of unwanted thoughts was controlled for, the metacognitive style that was the strongest predictor of AVH-proneness was cognitive self-consciousness. Cognitive confidence and beliefs about the uncontrollability of thoughts were also significant predictors of AVH-proneness. These findings are used to revise existing models of the relations between metacognitive beliefs and AVHs. Implications for the management of AVHs are discussed.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1421-1432
Number of pages12
JournalPersonality and Individual Differences
Volume41
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2006
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Auditory verbal hallucinations
  • Intrusiveness of unwanted thoughts
  • Metacognitive beliefs
  • Thought suppression

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