The S-ROM hydroxyapatite proximally-coated modular femoral stem in revision hip replacement: Results of 397 hips at a minimum ten-year follow-up

A. M. Imbuldeniya*, W. K. Walter, B. A. Zicat, W. L. Walter

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We report on 397 consecutive revision total hip replacements in 371 patients with a mean clinical and radiological follow-up of 12.9 years (10 to 17.7). The mean age at surgery was 69 years (37 to 93). A total of 28 patients (8%) underwent further revision, including 16 (4%) femoral components. In all 223 patients (56%, 233 hips) died without further revision and 20 patients (5%, 20 hips) were lost to follow-up. Of the remaining patients, 209 (221 hips) were available for clinical assessment and 194 (205 hips) for radiological review at mean follow-up of 12.9 years (10 to 17.7). The mean Harris Hip Score improved from 58.7 (11 to 92) points to 80.7 (21 to 100) (p < 0.001) and the mean Merle d'Aubigné and Postel hip scores at final follow-up were 4.9 (2 to 6), 4.5 (2 to 6) and 4.3 (2 to 6), respectively for pain, mobility and function. Radiographs showed no lucencies around 186 (90.7%) femoral stems with stable bony ingrowth seen in 199 stems (97%). The survival of the S-ROM femoral stem at 15 years with revision for any reason as the endpoint was 90.5% (95% confidence interval (CI) 85.7 to 93.8) and with revision for aseptic loosening as the endpoint 99.3% (95% CI 97.2 to 99.8). We have shown excellent long-term survivorship and good clinical outcome of a cementless hydroxyapatite proximally-coated modular femoral stem in revision hip surgery.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)730-736
Number of pages7
JournalBone and Joint Journal
Volume96 B
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2014
Externally publishedYes

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