The Sanctity of life in law: comparisons between Jewish, Catholic, Islamic and common law approaches

Cameron Stewart

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterpeer-review

Abstract

The chapter begins with a general outline of the central tenets of Jewish law, Catholic law and Islamic law, for an examination of how these religions value the sanctity of life. In later parts, the chapter looks at specific situations to examine how the sanctity of life principle works in comparison with the common law; in laws of abortion; and how and when medical treatment can be refused. It is contended that in areas of both abortion and treatment refusal, the common law has drawn heavily on religious ideas found in Judaism, Catholicism, and Islam.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationLaw and religion
Subtitle of host publicationGod, the state and common law
EditorsPeter Radan, Denise Meyerson, Rosalind F Croucher
Place of PublicationLondon, UK; New York, USA
PublisherRoutledge, Taylor and Francis Group
Pages269-294
Number of pages26
ISBN (Print)9780415343534
Publication statusPublished - 2005

Publication series

NameRoutledge studies in religion
PublisherRoutledge

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