The timing of Carcinus maenas recruitment to a south-east Australian estuary differs to that of native crabs

C. J. Garside, T. M. Glasby, L. J. Stone, M. J. Bishop

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Strong seasonal trends in reproduction and early development of many invasive species are commonplace and may differ between introduced and native ranges, reflecting differences in abiotic conditions that trigger reproduction, or in selective pressures. The invasive crab Carcinus maenas has been present in south-east Australia for over 100 years, but little is known about its recruitment to benthic substrates in this introduced range. This study assessed the timing of C. maenas and native crab recruitment to Merimbula Lake (36.89oS, 149.92oE) south-eastern Australia between August 2011 and October 2013. It also assessed the effectiveness of four different types of recruitment bags for detecting the invasive crab. Carcinus maenas recruited in greater numbers to bags that contained live oysters than those with oyster shell, artificial turf or without structure. Recruitment of C. maenas peaked in the late winter and spring, while recruitment of most native species peaked in autumn. The timing of C. maenas recruitment contrasted its native European range where recruitment typically occurs in summer and autumn. Although likely triggered by the warmer water temperatures of south-eastern Australia, this differing reproductive phenology of C. maenas between its native and Australian range may also modify its interactions with native crab recruits.

LanguageEnglish
Pages41-53
Number of pages13
JournalHydrobiologia
Volume762
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 6 Jun 2015

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Carcinus maenas
crab
crabs
estuaries
estuary
bags
autumn
shell (molluscs)
lawns and turf
warm water
invasive species
native species
oysters
phenology
early development
water temperature
indigenous species
shell
substrate
lakes

Cite this

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title = "The timing of Carcinus maenas recruitment to a south-east Australian estuary differs to that of native crabs",
abstract = "Strong seasonal trends in reproduction and early development of many invasive species are commonplace and may differ between introduced and native ranges, reflecting differences in abiotic conditions that trigger reproduction, or in selective pressures. The invasive crab Carcinus maenas has been present in south-east Australia for over 100 years, but little is known about its recruitment to benthic substrates in this introduced range. This study assessed the timing of C. maenas and native crab recruitment to Merimbula Lake (36.89oS, 149.92oE) south-eastern Australia between August 2011 and October 2013. It also assessed the effectiveness of four different types of recruitment bags for detecting the invasive crab. Carcinus maenas recruited in greater numbers to bags that contained live oysters than those with oyster shell, artificial turf or without structure. Recruitment of C. maenas peaked in the late winter and spring, while recruitment of most native species peaked in autumn. The timing of C. maenas recruitment contrasted its native European range where recruitment typically occurs in summer and autumn. Although likely triggered by the warmer water temperatures of south-eastern Australia, this differing reproductive phenology of C. maenas between its native and Australian range may also modify its interactions with native crab recruits.",
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The timing of Carcinus maenas recruitment to a south-east Australian estuary differs to that of native crabs. / Garside, C. J.; Glasby, T. M.; Stone, L. J.; Bishop, M. J.

In: Hydrobiologia, Vol. 762, No. 1, 06.06.2015, p. 41-53.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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