The use of colloid probe microscopy to predict aerosolization performance in dry powder inhalers: AFM and in vitro correlation

Paul M. Young, Michael J. Tobyn, Robert Price, Mark Buttrum, Fiona Dey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The atomic force microscope (AFM) colloid probe technique was utilized to measure cohesion forces (separation energy) between three drug systems as a function of relative humidity (RH). The subsequent data was correlated with in vitro aerosolization data collected over the same RH range. Three drug-only systems were chosen for study; salbutamol sulphate (SS), triamcinolone acetonide (TAA), and di-sodium cromoglycate (DSCG). Analysis of the AFM and in vitro data suggested good correlations, with the separation energy being related inversely to the aerosolization performance (measured as fine particle fraction, FPFLD). In addition, the relationship between, cohesion, RH, and aerosolization performance was drug specific. For example, an increase in RH between 15% and 75% resulted in increased cohesion and decreased FPFLD for SS and DSCG. In comparison, for TAA, a decrease in cohesion and increased FPFLD was observed when RH was increased (15–75%). Linear regression analysis comparing AFM with in vitro data indicated R2 values>0.80, for all data sets, suggesting the AFM could be used to indicate in vitro aerosolization performance.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1800-1809
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Pharmaceutical Sciences
Volume95
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Aug 2006
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • AFM
  • colloid probe
  • adhesion
  • dry powder inhaler
  • in vitro
  • humidity

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