The use of culturally congruent spiritual beliefs in the successful treatment of two cases of complicated bereavement for infant death

P. K F Lee, Roy Laube*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The cognitive model of clinical practice involves identifying significant beliefs, including spiritual beliefs. Traditional belief in Taoism was elicited from two Cantonese-speaking women referred for assessment after psychiatric admission for complicated bereavement. Their belief was incorporated into the formulations and the treatment plans. Pathological guilt was addressed by gentle cognitive challenge and reframing. Relevant spiritual practices were explored and supported, which allowed recovery to proceed. These cases highlight the value of cross-cultural consultation and illustrate that spiritually sensitive intervention is compatible with evidence-based practice.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)349-353
Number of pages5
JournalMental Health, Religion and Culture
Volume11
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2008
Externally publishedYes

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