The Use of Linguistic Cues in Sentence Comprehension by Mandarin-Speaking Children with High-Functioning Autism

Peng Zhou*, Stephen Crain, Liqun Gao, Meixiang Jia

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    3 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Two studies were conducted to investigate how high-functioning children with autism use different linguistic cues in sentence comprehension. Two types of linguistic cues were investigated: word order and morphosyntactic cues. The results show that children with autism can use both types of cues in sentence comprehension. However, compared to age-matched typically developing peers, children with autism relied significantly more on word order cues and exhibited significantly more difficulties in interpreting sentences in which there was a conflict between the morphosyntactic cue and the word order cue. We attribute the difficulties exhibited by children with autism to their deficits in executive function. We then discuss the implications of the findings for understanding the nature of the sentence processing mechanism in autism.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)17-32
    Number of pages16
    JournalJournal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
    Volume47
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2017

    Keywords

    • Autism
    • Sentence comprehension
    • Linguistic cues
    • Word order
    • Executive function
    • Child language

    Fingerprint

    Dive into the research topics of 'The Use of Linguistic Cues in Sentence Comprehension by Mandarin-Speaking Children with High-Functioning Autism'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this