Thermal comfort in the humid tropics. Part I. Climate chamber experiments on temperature preferences in Singapore

R. J. de Dear*, K. G. Leow, A. Ameen

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    65 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Preferred room temperatures were determined for 16 male and 16 female college-age subjects who were naturally acclimatized to Singapore's year-round hot and humid equatorial climate. Each subject participated in one comfort experiment lasting two and a half hours in a climate chamber. Preferred ambient temperature was determined by adjusting the climate chamber's thermostat every 10 minutes according to the subject's wishes. The subjects were clothed in a standard uniform and remained sedentary throughout the experiment. Skin temperatures at 14 sites, evaporative weight loss, and thermal sensations were also measured. The mean of the 32 individually determined preferred temperatures at the end of the two-and-a-half-hour exposure was 25.4°C, with a between-subjects standard deviation of 1.2 K. Preferred mean skin temperature was 33.1°C and mean evaporative weight loss observed during the experiment was 21.0 g·m-2·h-1. These findings are compared with those of similar experiments conducted in colder climatic zones and with different types of subjects. Statistically insignificant differences suggest that humans cannot be naturally adapted to prefer warmer ambient temperatures.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)874-879
    Number of pages6
    JournalASHRAE Transactions
    Issue numberpt 1
    Publication statusPublished - 1991

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