Towards the design of a virtual sociologist on aborigines substance abuse: a coping-theory perspective

Manolya Kavakli*, Manning Li, Tarashankar Rudra

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding contributionpeer-review

Abstract

Aborigines are the original inhabitants of Australia. Colonisation and subsequent alienation through perpetual neglect and torture eventuated in the excessive consumption of alcohol and illegal substances in their society. To tackle this serious problem, we propose an interactive virtual sociologist, Mr. W, as an embodied conversational agent that will simulate the role of a real sociologist in advising on strategies to overcome their addiction to substance use. Guided by coping theory, we come up with an optimal system design for the Virtual Counselor, Mr. W. We believe that such a system with affective human computer interaction interface will motivate Aboriginal Australians to lead a better quality of life alongside the rest of the Australian community in enjoying the fruits of socio-economic prosperity of the country.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationIEEE CyberneticsCom 2012
Subtitle of host publicationIEEE International Conference on Computational Intelligence and Cybernetics: proceeding, 12-14 July 2012, Bali, Indonesia
EditorsWahidin Wahab, Abdul Muis, Aryo De Wibowo
Place of PublicationPiscataway, NJ
PublisherInstitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE)
Pages50-54
Number of pages5
ISBN (Print)9781467308922
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012
Event2012 1st IEEE International Conference on Computational Intelligence and Cybernetics, CyberneticsCom 2012 - Bali, Indonesia
Duration: 12 Jul 201214 Jul 2012

Other

Other2012 1st IEEE International Conference on Computational Intelligence and Cybernetics, CyberneticsCom 2012
CountryIndonesia
CityBali
Period12/07/1214/07/12

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