Treadmill training provides greater benefit to the subgroup of community-dwelling people after stroke who walk faster than 0.4 m/s: a randomised trial

Catherine M. Dean, Louise Ada, Richard I. Lindley

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

    Abstract

    Question: After stroke, does treadmill training provide greater benefit to the subgroup of community-dwelling people who walk faster than 0.4. m/s than those who walk more slowly? Design: Subgroup analysis of a randomised trial: the AMBULATE trial. Participants: 68 people with stroke living in the community. Intervention: The experimental group received 30 minutes of treadmill and overground walking, three times a week for four months; the control group received no intervention. Outcome measures: The primary outcome was walking distance covered during the six-minute walk test. Other outcomes were comfortable and fast walking speed and health status. Results: At four months, in the subgroup of participants with a baseline comfortable walking speed of > 0.4. m/s, treadmill training produced an extra distance of 72. m (95% CI 23 to 121) and an increased comfortable speed of 0.16. m/s (95% CI 0.00 to 0.32), compared with the subgroup with a speed of ≤. 0.4. m/s. There was also a trend towards an extra fast speed of 0.17. m/s (95% CI -0.04 to 0.36). There was no extra effect of treadmill training in the faster walkers in terms of EuroQol 5Q-5D. There were no differences between the experimental and control groups between subgroups in the long term. Conclusion: Treadmill training is more likely to benefit people who walk at a speed of > 0.4. m/s. Clinicians should use comfortable walking speed to predict the potential for improvement and to guide intervention. Trial registration: ACTRN12607000227493. [Dean CM, Ada L, Lindley RI, (2014) Treadmill training provides greater benefit to the subgroup of community- dwelling people after stroke who walk faster than 0.4 m/s: a randomised trial. Journal of Physiotherapy 60: 97-101].

    LanguageEnglish
    Pages97-101
    Number of pages5
    JournalJournal of Physiotherapy
    Volume60
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2014

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    Independent Living
    Stroke
    Walking
    Walkers
    Control Groups
    Health Status
    Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
    Walking Speed

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    title = "Treadmill training provides greater benefit to the subgroup of community-dwelling people after stroke who walk faster than 0.4 m/s: a randomised trial",
    abstract = "Question: After stroke, does treadmill training provide greater benefit to the subgroup of community-dwelling people who walk faster than 0.4. m/s than those who walk more slowly? Design: Subgroup analysis of a randomised trial: the AMBULATE trial. Participants: 68 people with stroke living in the community. Intervention: The experimental group received 30 minutes of treadmill and overground walking, three times a week for four months; the control group received no intervention. Outcome measures: The primary outcome was walking distance covered during the six-minute walk test. Other outcomes were comfortable and fast walking speed and health status. Results: At four months, in the subgroup of participants with a baseline comfortable walking speed of > 0.4. m/s, treadmill training produced an extra distance of 72. m (95{\%} CI 23 to 121) and an increased comfortable speed of 0.16. m/s (95{\%} CI 0.00 to 0.32), compared with the subgroup with a speed of ≤. 0.4. m/s. There was also a trend towards an extra fast speed of 0.17. m/s (95{\%} CI -0.04 to 0.36). There was no extra effect of treadmill training in the faster walkers in terms of EuroQol 5Q-5D. There were no differences between the experimental and control groups between subgroups in the long term. Conclusion: Treadmill training is more likely to benefit people who walk at a speed of > 0.4. m/s. Clinicians should use comfortable walking speed to predict the potential for improvement and to guide intervention. Trial registration: ACTRN12607000227493. [Dean CM, Ada L, Lindley RI, (2014) Treadmill training provides greater benefit to the subgroup of community- dwelling people after stroke who walk faster than 0.4 m/s: a randomised trial. Journal of Physiotherapy 60: 97-101].",
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    Treadmill training provides greater benefit to the subgroup of community-dwelling people after stroke who walk faster than 0.4 m/s : a randomised trial. / Dean, Catherine M.; Ada, Louise; Lindley, Richard I.

    In: Journal of Physiotherapy, Vol. 60, No. 2, 2014, p. 97-101.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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    N2 - Question: After stroke, does treadmill training provide greater benefit to the subgroup of community-dwelling people who walk faster than 0.4. m/s than those who walk more slowly? Design: Subgroup analysis of a randomised trial: the AMBULATE trial. Participants: 68 people with stroke living in the community. Intervention: The experimental group received 30 minutes of treadmill and overground walking, three times a week for four months; the control group received no intervention. Outcome measures: The primary outcome was walking distance covered during the six-minute walk test. Other outcomes were comfortable and fast walking speed and health status. Results: At four months, in the subgroup of participants with a baseline comfortable walking speed of > 0.4. m/s, treadmill training produced an extra distance of 72. m (95% CI 23 to 121) and an increased comfortable speed of 0.16. m/s (95% CI 0.00 to 0.32), compared with the subgroup with a speed of ≤. 0.4. m/s. There was also a trend towards an extra fast speed of 0.17. m/s (95% CI -0.04 to 0.36). There was no extra effect of treadmill training in the faster walkers in terms of EuroQol 5Q-5D. There were no differences between the experimental and control groups between subgroups in the long term. Conclusion: Treadmill training is more likely to benefit people who walk at a speed of > 0.4. m/s. Clinicians should use comfortable walking speed to predict the potential for improvement and to guide intervention. Trial registration: ACTRN12607000227493. [Dean CM, Ada L, Lindley RI, (2014) Treadmill training provides greater benefit to the subgroup of community- dwelling people after stroke who walk faster than 0.4 m/s: a randomised trial. Journal of Physiotherapy 60: 97-101].

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