Tsunami vulnerability assessment and its implications for coastal hazard analysis and disaster management planning, Gulf of Corinth, Greece

M. Papathoma, D. Dominey-Howes

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    88 Citations (Scopus)
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    Abstract

    We apply a new tsunami vulnerability assessment method to two coastal villages in the Gulf of Corinth, Greece using the 7th February 1963 tsunami as a worse case scenario. In Akoli, 46.5% of all buildings are classified highly vulnerable (BV). Approximately, 26.3% of all households are located within buildings with a High BV classification whereas 85% of all businesses are located within buildings with a High BV classification and 13.7% of the population is located within buildings with a High BV classification. In Selianitika, 28.8% of all buildings are classified with a High BV and 11% of all households are located within buildings with a High BV classification. Also 29.3% of all businesses and 33.4% of all services are located within buildings with a High BV classification and 6.7% of the population is located within buildings with a High BV classification. We estimate the minimum costs of a hypothetical tsunami with a wave run-up (H(m)max) of +5 m. The results are considered significant because they have important implications for coastal risk assessment, resource allocation and disaster management planning.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)733-747
    Number of pages15
    JournalNatural Hazards and Earth System Sciences
    Volume3
    Issue number6
    Publication statusPublished - 2003

    Bibliographical note

    Copyright 2003 Papathoma et al; licensee European Geosciences Union. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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