Unconscious priming eliminates automatic binding of colour and alphanumeric form in synaesthesia

Jason B. Mattingley*, Anina N. Rich, Greg Yelland, John L. Bradshaw

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

226 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Synaesthesia is an unusual perceptual phenomenon in which events in one sensory modality induce vivid sensations in another. Individuals may 'taste' shapes, 'hear' colours, or 'feel' sounds. Synaesthesia was first described over a century ago, but little is known about its underlying causes or its effects on cognition. Most reports have been anecdotal or have focused on isolated unusual cases. Here we report an investigation of 15 individuals with colour-graphemic synaesthesia, each of whom experiences idiosyncratic but highly consistent colours for letters and digits. Using a colour-form interference paradigm, we show that induced synaesthetic experiences cannot be consciously suppressed even when detrimental to task performance. In contrast, if letters and digits are presented briefly and masked, so that they are processed but unavailable for overt report, the synaesthesia is eliminated. These results show that synaesthetic experiences can be prevented despite substantial processing of the sensory stimuli that otherwise trigger them. We conclude that automatic binding of colour and alphanumeric form in synaesthesia arises after initial processes of letter and digit recognition are complete.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)580-582
Number of pages3
JournalNature
Volume410
Issue number6828
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 29 Mar 2001
Externally publishedYes

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