Understanding genomic health information: how to meet the needs of the culturally and linguistically diverse community—a mixed methods study

Eloise Uebergang*, Stephanie Best, Michelle G. de Silva, Keri Finlay

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Clinical genomic testing, analysis of your entire genetic material for healthcare purposes, is a complex topic for various medical specialities. Although Australia is a multicultural society, most genomic resources are produced in English which can make understanding challenging for people from culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) backgrounds. A mixed methods approach explored the views of healthcare interpreters and people from CALD backgrounds to identify knowledge gaps and inform the provision of more equitable services. Eighteen healthcare interpreters completed a survey from two public hospitals in Melbourne. Descriptive data analysis informed the four pilot interviews with individuals from CALD backgrounds identified through online advertisements. Interpreters revealed variable satisfaction with patient understanding of genomic concepts and suggested that basic training and resources on genomics would help facilitate interpretation. Three themes arose from the pilot interviews: (1) cultural factors; (2) perceptions of genomics; and (3) language barriers and complex terminology. Resources that consider cultural differences and language barriers will help to ensure people from CALD backgrounds are adequately informed about genomic testing. The pilot interviews will inform future in-depth studies of the views of people from the CALD community.

Original languageEnglish
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Community Genetics
Early online date29 Jun 2021
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 29 Jun 2021

Keywords

  • CALD
  • Clinical genomics
  • Genomic resources
  • Genomic testing
  • Healthcare interpreter

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