Understanding the impact of tablet PCs on student learning and academic teaching

Steve Clark*, Lucy Taylor, Joanne Pickering, Andrew Wait

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding contributionpeer-review

Abstract

During semester 2, 2005 and semester 1, 2006 three academics in the Faculty of Economics and Business at the University of Sydney were invited to trial the use of Tablet PCs to deliver their presentations in lectures. This paper presents a study of teaching with Tablet PCs, combining real-time handwritten annotation with prepared material on digital slides, and evaluates the likelihood of its adoption as a teaching tool among academics. We gathered feedback from students by using a survey and provided a discussion board where students could post comments. We conducted interviews with academics using questions based on Rogers (2003) study into the impact of innovation on teaching. The results of this study will be used to inform the future direction of Tablet PCs in the Faculty and contribute knowledge to the broader learning community on this teaching tool.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 23rd Annual Conference of the Australasian Society for Computers in Learning in Tertiary Education
Subtitle of host publicationWho's Learning? Whose Technology?, ASCILITE 2006
Pages968
Number of pages1
Volume2
Publication statusPublished - 2006
Externally publishedYes
Event23rd Annual Conference of the Australasian Society for Computers in Learning in Tertiary Education - "Who's Learning? Whose Technology?" - ASCILITE 2006 - Sydney, NSW, Australia
Duration: 3 Dec 20066 Dec 2006

Other

Other23rd Annual Conference of the Australasian Society for Computers in Learning in Tertiary Education - "Who's Learning? Whose Technology?" - ASCILITE 2006
CountryAustralia
CitySydney, NSW
Period3/12/066/12/06

Keywords

  • Innovation
  • Tablet PCs

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