University educator mindsets: how might adult constructive-developmental theory support design of adaptive learning?

Cherry Stewart*, Brenda Wolodko

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalComment/opinionpeer-review

    4 Citations (Scopus)
    336 Downloads (Pure)

    Abstract

    This article explores Robert Kegan's adult constructive-developmental (ACD) theory. We compare these ideas to the way educators at each of Kegan's meaning-making levels might plan, implement, and assess digitally enhanced teaching activities. Using Drago-Severson's interpretation of Kegan's concepts, the authors propose that behaviors of university teaching practitioners indicate mindsets evident at four ACD levels—instrumental, socialized, self-authoring, and self-transforming. Higher education professional development literature has identified a significant gap in practitioner implementation of interactive strategies using digital tools. If university practitioners increase their mental complexity they may become more adaptive in the application of interactive pedagogies and digital technologies. Adaptive approaches might cultivate new pedagogies supporting and challenging students toward more complex and flexible qualities of mind.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)247-255
    Number of pages9
    JournalMind, Brain, and Education
    Volume10
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Dec 2016

    Bibliographical note

    Copyright the Author(s) 2016. Version archived for private and non-commercial use with the permission of the author/s and according to publisher conditions. For further rights please contact the publisher.

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