Urinary lead isotopes during pregnancy and postpartum indicate no preferential partitioning of endogenous lead into plasma

B. L. Gulson*, K. J. Mizon, J. M. Palmer, M. J. Korsch, N. Patison, C. W. Jameson, J. B. Donnelly

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We have compared lead isotopic ratios and lead concentrations in 51 matched blood and spot urine samples from 13 subjects covering the interval from before pregnancy through 180 days postpartum to evaluate whether mobilization of lead from the maternal skeleton is preferentially partitioned into plasma; we hove used urine as on isotopic proxy for plasma. There was no statistically significant difference in the lead 206/lead 204 and lead 207/lead 206 ratios over pregnancy. The urine data for the postpartum period ore in the opposite relationships to that predicted for o preferential partitioning hypothesis. These data provide no support for the hypothesis that lead released from the skeleton is preferentially partitioned into plasma.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)236-242
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Laboratory and Clinical Medicine
Volume136
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2000

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