Use of linguistic estimates and vegetation indices to assess post-fire vegetation regrowth in woodland areas

Carol R. Jacobson*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examined an area of woodland that was recovering from severe fire in Royal National Park (NSW, Australia). A non-destructive method of field sampling is required for vulnerable recovering vegetation and therefore classification of digital photographs using linguistic terms was trialled. The linguistic data for three vegetation strata (canopy, shrub and ground) were converted to crisp scores and compared with vegetation index data derived from remotely sensed imagery. All possible subset regression was used to test the proposition that the combined vegetation scores (independent variables) would explain the values of NDVI (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index) and NDMI (Normalized Difference Moisture Index). Vegetation scores for the three strata were also combined using simplified weighting ratios to assess broad relationships between the indices and field data. The combined vegetation scores explained ∼60% of the variation in the vegetation index data and inclusion of variables representing multiple strata explained more of the variation than any single variable. The precise value of the weights used to combine the layers did not affect the strength of the association. A simple ratio is proposed that may be useful to estimate woodland parameters under similar conditions, by inversion of the relationship with vegetation index data.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)94-103
Number of pages10
JournalInternational Journal of Wildland Fire
Volume19
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010

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