Use of the CogState brief battery in the assessment of Alzheimer's disease related cognitive impairment in the Australian Imaging, Biomarkers and Lifestyle (AIBL) study

Yen Ying Lim*, Kathryn A. Ellis, Karra Harrington, David Ames, Ralph N. Martins, Colin L. Masters, Christopher Rowe, Greg Savage, Cassandra Szoeke, David Darby, Paul Maruff, The AIBL Research Group

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    77 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The aim of this study was to validate the CogState Brief Battery, which assesses psychomotor, attentional, working memory, and visual learning functions, in healthy older people and in patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer's disease (AD), enrolled in the Australian Imaging, Biomarkers and Lifestyle (AIBL) study. In healthy older adults, weak relationships between demographic variables (e.g., education, depression) and cognitive performance were observed. In AD and MCI groups, the magnitude of impairment was greatest for tasks of working memory and memory, with a negative influence of apolipoprotein E ε4 status on learning but not working memory. These results suggest that the CogState Brief Battery can be used to screen for AD-related cognitive changes.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)345-358
    Number of pages14
    JournalJournal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology
    Volume34
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2012

    Keywords

    • Alzheimer’s disease
    • CogState
    • Australian imaging
    • Biomarkers and Lifestyle study
    • Apolipoprotein E ε4
    • Cognitive testing

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