Use of the structured interview matrix to enhance community resilience through collaboration and inclusive engagement

Tracey L. O'Sullivan*, Wayne Corneil, Craig E. Kuziemsky, Darene Toal-Sullivan

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The EnRiCH Project was formed to address challenges with disaster management for high risk populations. The theoretical foundation is based on salutogenesis, systems theory and community resilience, with emphasis on community assets, social capital, citizen participation, and collaborative practice, which support adaptive capacity to respond and recover from adverse events. We present results from the process evaluation of the use of the structured interview matrix (SIM) facilitation technique as a first step in asset-mapping for a community resilience intervention. Nine SIM sessions were conducted across five geographic communities (n=143) with professionals and volunteers from emergency management, health and social services, community organisations and citizens who represent high risk populations. Open-ended questionnaires were completed by (n=139) participants to document experiences of partaking in the session. Content analysis suggests that the SIM is an effective technique to enhance connectedness, common ground, collaborative action, and awareness of existing services and supports in each community.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)616-628
Number of pages13
JournalSystems Research and Behavioral Science
Volume32
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Nov 2015
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Awareness
  • Common ground
  • Preparedness
  • Resilience
  • Salutogenesis

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