User evaluation of standardised water accounting reports: an accountability perspective

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding contributionResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Purpose – This paper explores the perceptions of potential users of water accounting reports prepared under Standardised Water Accounting (SWA), reflected in the Exposure Draft of Australian Water Accounting Standard 1 (ED AWAS 1), and, in particular, their perceptions regarding the discharge of accountability by water managers. Efficient and effective water management is an important element in alleviating water crises caused by misuse of water resources. Design/methodology/approach – The theoretical framework adopted is Accountability. This concept is explored in depth across three main ideas. A questionnaire was administered to users with water-related interests in five different water-related seminars yielding 36 usable responses. Most questions were closed ended with possible responses ranging from either a five-point Likert scale or a ‘Yes/No/Undecided’. Findings – The majority of respondents perceive that it is useful to use a standard system to prepare water accounting reports (applying SWA). Moreover, the majority of potential users are unsure about the effectiveness of such reports in discharging the accountability of water managers, and a significant number of stakeholders were unaware of its development. Research limitations/implications – Whilst the questionnaire was administered at key water-related seminars, the response rate was low at approximately 21%. Understanding the perceptions of attendees at those events is important because respondents were stakeholders with a water-related interest. Future research might complement this quantitative analysis with a qualitative study of user perceptions. Practical implications – Stakeholders have interest in the current SWA project. It is therefore important to identify the information needs of stakeholders. Originality/value – SWA is currently ongoing in Australia and the Exposure Draft of Australian Water Accounting Standard 1 was issued in mid-2010. The study has sought to overcome the limited research undertaken to date to explore the perceptions of potential users of water accounting reports under SWA.
LanguageEnglish
Title of host publicationCSEAR 2011 Australasian Conference
Subtitle of host publicationconference proceedings : CSEAR toward sustainable futures : earth, wind, fire and water
Place of PublicationHobart
PublisherUniversity of Tasmania
Number of pages25
Publication statusPublished - 2011
EventAustralasian Conference on Social and Environmental Accounting Research (10th : 2011) - Launceston
Duration: 5 Dec 20117 Dec 2011

Conference

ConferenceAustralasian Conference on Social and Environmental Accounting Research (10th : 2011)
CityLaunceston
Period5/12/117/12/11

Fingerprint

Accountability
Water
Evaluation
Stakeholders
Questionnaire
Accounting standards
Draft
Managers
Qualitative study
Information needs
Water resources
Response rate
Water management
Theoretical framework
Design methodology
Quantitative analysis

Bibliographical note

Also titled 'Perspectives of potential users of water accounting reports : an accountability point of view'

Keywords

  • water
  • water accounting
  • users
  • social and environmental accounting
  • Australia

Cite this

Tello, E., Cummings, L., & Hazelton, J. (2011). User evaluation of standardised water accounting reports: an accountability perspective. In CSEAR 2011 Australasian Conference: conference proceedings : CSEAR toward sustainable futures : earth, wind, fire and water Hobart: University of Tasmania.
Tello, Edward ; Cummings, Lorne ; Hazelton, James. / User evaluation of standardised water accounting reports : an accountability perspective. CSEAR 2011 Australasian Conference: conference proceedings : CSEAR toward sustainable futures : earth, wind, fire and water. Hobart : University of Tasmania, 2011.
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abstract = "Purpose – This paper explores the perceptions of potential users of water accounting reports prepared under Standardised Water Accounting (SWA), reflected in the Exposure Draft of Australian Water Accounting Standard 1 (ED AWAS 1), and, in particular, their perceptions regarding the discharge of accountability by water managers. Efficient and effective water management is an important element in alleviating water crises caused by misuse of water resources. Design/methodology/approach – The theoretical framework adopted is Accountability. This concept is explored in depth across three main ideas. A questionnaire was administered to users with water-related interests in five different water-related seminars yielding 36 usable responses. Most questions were closed ended with possible responses ranging from either a five-point Likert scale or a ‘Yes/No/Undecided’. Findings – The majority of respondents perceive that it is useful to use a standard system to prepare water accounting reports (applying SWA). Moreover, the majority of potential users are unsure about the effectiveness of such reports in discharging the accountability of water managers, and a significant number of stakeholders were unaware of its development. Research limitations/implications – Whilst the questionnaire was administered at key water-related seminars, the response rate was low at approximately 21{\%}. Understanding the perceptions of attendees at those events is important because respondents were stakeholders with a water-related interest. Future research might complement this quantitative analysis with a qualitative study of user perceptions. Practical implications – Stakeholders have interest in the current SWA project. It is therefore important to identify the information needs of stakeholders. Originality/value – SWA is currently ongoing in Australia and the Exposure Draft of Australian Water Accounting Standard 1 was issued in mid-2010. The study has sought to overcome the limited research undertaken to date to explore the perceptions of potential users of water accounting reports under SWA.",
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Tello, E, Cummings, L & Hazelton, J 2011, User evaluation of standardised water accounting reports: an accountability perspective. in CSEAR 2011 Australasian Conference: conference proceedings : CSEAR toward sustainable futures : earth, wind, fire and water. University of Tasmania, Hobart, Australasian Conference on Social and Environmental Accounting Research (10th : 2011), Launceston, 5/12/11.

User evaluation of standardised water accounting reports : an accountability perspective. / Tello, Edward; Cummings, Lorne; Hazelton, James.

CSEAR 2011 Australasian Conference: conference proceedings : CSEAR toward sustainable futures : earth, wind, fire and water. Hobart : University of Tasmania, 2011.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding contributionResearchpeer-review

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T1 - User evaluation of standardised water accounting reports

T2 - an accountability perspective

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AU - Cummings, Lorne

AU - Hazelton, James

N1 - Also titled 'Perspectives of potential users of water accounting reports : an accountability point of view'

PY - 2011

Y1 - 2011

N2 - Purpose – This paper explores the perceptions of potential users of water accounting reports prepared under Standardised Water Accounting (SWA), reflected in the Exposure Draft of Australian Water Accounting Standard 1 (ED AWAS 1), and, in particular, their perceptions regarding the discharge of accountability by water managers. Efficient and effective water management is an important element in alleviating water crises caused by misuse of water resources. Design/methodology/approach – The theoretical framework adopted is Accountability. This concept is explored in depth across three main ideas. A questionnaire was administered to users with water-related interests in five different water-related seminars yielding 36 usable responses. Most questions were closed ended with possible responses ranging from either a five-point Likert scale or a ‘Yes/No/Undecided’. Findings – The majority of respondents perceive that it is useful to use a standard system to prepare water accounting reports (applying SWA). Moreover, the majority of potential users are unsure about the effectiveness of such reports in discharging the accountability of water managers, and a significant number of stakeholders were unaware of its development. Research limitations/implications – Whilst the questionnaire was administered at key water-related seminars, the response rate was low at approximately 21%. Understanding the perceptions of attendees at those events is important because respondents were stakeholders with a water-related interest. Future research might complement this quantitative analysis with a qualitative study of user perceptions. Practical implications – Stakeholders have interest in the current SWA project. It is therefore important to identify the information needs of stakeholders. Originality/value – SWA is currently ongoing in Australia and the Exposure Draft of Australian Water Accounting Standard 1 was issued in mid-2010. The study has sought to overcome the limited research undertaken to date to explore the perceptions of potential users of water accounting reports under SWA.

AB - Purpose – This paper explores the perceptions of potential users of water accounting reports prepared under Standardised Water Accounting (SWA), reflected in the Exposure Draft of Australian Water Accounting Standard 1 (ED AWAS 1), and, in particular, their perceptions regarding the discharge of accountability by water managers. Efficient and effective water management is an important element in alleviating water crises caused by misuse of water resources. Design/methodology/approach – The theoretical framework adopted is Accountability. This concept is explored in depth across three main ideas. A questionnaire was administered to users with water-related interests in five different water-related seminars yielding 36 usable responses. Most questions were closed ended with possible responses ranging from either a five-point Likert scale or a ‘Yes/No/Undecided’. Findings – The majority of respondents perceive that it is useful to use a standard system to prepare water accounting reports (applying SWA). Moreover, the majority of potential users are unsure about the effectiveness of such reports in discharging the accountability of water managers, and a significant number of stakeholders were unaware of its development. Research limitations/implications – Whilst the questionnaire was administered at key water-related seminars, the response rate was low at approximately 21%. Understanding the perceptions of attendees at those events is important because respondents were stakeholders with a water-related interest. Future research might complement this quantitative analysis with a qualitative study of user perceptions. Practical implications – Stakeholders have interest in the current SWA project. It is therefore important to identify the information needs of stakeholders. Originality/value – SWA is currently ongoing in Australia and the Exposure Draft of Australian Water Accounting Standard 1 was issued in mid-2010. The study has sought to overcome the limited research undertaken to date to explore the perceptions of potential users of water accounting reports under SWA.

KW - water

KW - water accounting

KW - users

KW - social and environmental accounting

KW - Australia

M3 - Conference proceeding contribution

BT - CSEAR 2011 Australasian Conference

PB - University of Tasmania

CY - Hobart

ER -

Tello E, Cummings L, Hazelton J. User evaluation of standardised water accounting reports: an accountability perspective. In CSEAR 2011 Australasian Conference: conference proceedings : CSEAR toward sustainable futures : earth, wind, fire and water. Hobart: University of Tasmania. 2011