Using advanced 2D materials to closely mimic vestibular hair cell sensors

Sajad A. Moshizi, Shohreh Azadi, Andrew Belford, Shuying Wu, Zhao J. Han, Mohsen Asadnia

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding contributionpeer-review

Abstract

In this work, an ultra-sensitive flow sensor is presented, consisting of vertically grown graphene nanosheets (VGNs) with a mazelike structure and an elastomer (polydimethylsiloxane, PDMS). The VGNs/PDMS piezoresistive flow sensor exhibits great linearity, low-velocity detection threshold (1.127 mm/s) and super-high sensitivity under exposure to stationary flow (0.127 kΩ/(mL/min)). The proposed flow sensor, analogous to hair cells in the vestibular system, was embedded in a 3D-printed lateral semicircular canal, and the sensing performance was studied in response to various physiological movements. This work paves the way for development of physical sensors using novel two-dimensional (2D) materials for various biomedical applications.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationThe 2021 21st International Conference on Solid-State Sensors, Actuators and Microsystems (Transducers) proceedings
Place of PublicationPiscataway, NJ
PublisherInstitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE)
Pages739-742
Number of pages4
ISBN (Electronic)9781665412674
ISBN (Print)9781665448451
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2021
Event21st International Conference on Solid-State Sensors, Actuators and Microsystems, TRANSDUCERS 2021 - Virtual, Online, United States
Duration: 20 Jun 202125 Jun 2021

Publication series

Name
ISSN (Print)2167-0013
ISSN (Electronic)2167-0021

Conference

Conference21st International Conference on Solid-State Sensors, Actuators and Microsystems, TRANSDUCERS 2021
CountryUnited States
CityVirtual, Online
Period20/06/2125/06/21

Keywords

  • Vertical Graphene Nanosheets
  • Artificial Vestibular Hair cells
  • Bioinspired Sensors
  • Piezoresistive Sensors

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