Using game-based inquiry learning to meet the changing directions of science education

Shannon Kennedy-Clark*, Vilma Galstaun, Kate Anderson

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding contributionpeer-review

    5 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    This paper presents the results of a study designed to develop pre-service teachers' skills and pedagogical understanding of how game-based learning can be used in a classroom. The study used a technological pedagogical content knowledge (TPACK) conceptual model. 18 pre-service science teachers participated in the study that used Death in Rome, a point and click inquiry-based game to learn how to teach scientific inquiry. In the workshop the participants were required to complete several activities using game-based learning that included the evaluation of a range of online games and virtual worlds. Participants were required to complete pre-and post-tests. The results of the pre-and post-tests indicate that there was a significant shift in pre-service teachers' attitudes towards game-based learning as a result of the workshop. Overall, this study showed a positive change in attitudes towards game-based learning in science education.

    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationProceedings of the Annual Conference of the Australasian Society for Computers in Learning in Tertiary Education, ASCILITE 2011
    Pages702-714
    Number of pages13
    Publication statusPublished - 2011
    EventAnnual Conference of the Australasian Society for Computers in Learning in Tertiary Education - "Changing demands, changing directions", ASCILITE 2011 - Hobart, TAS, Australia
    Duration: 4 Dec 20117 Dec 2011

    Other

    OtherAnnual Conference of the Australasian Society for Computers in Learning in Tertiary Education - "Changing demands, changing directions", ASCILITE 2011
    CountryAustralia
    CityHobart, TAS
    Period4/12/117/12/11

    Keywords

    • Game-based learning
    • Inquiry
    • Pedagogy
    • Pre-service teachers
    • TPACK

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