Using self-monitoring to increase the on-task behaviour of three students with disabilities during independent work

Anastasia Anderson, Kevin Wheldall

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of using a tactile cued self-monitoring device (Watchminder) and a self-recording booklet to improve the on-task behaviour of three primary aged students with disabilities during independent work. A multiple baseline across students with reversal design was used. Two of three participants made clinically significant improvements in on-task behaviour, replicating prior research which found that reactivity from self-monitoring is idiosyncratic to student characteristics. No consistent relationship between self-monitoring accuracy and reactivity was apparent.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)3-17
    Number of pages15
    JournalAustralasian Journal of Special Education
    Volume27
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2003

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