Value of clinical algorithms to screen for gonococcal and chlamydial infection among women attending antenatal and family planning clinics

David Wilkinson, A. Willem Sturm

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Objectives. To determine the value of using KwaZulu-Natal Provincial Health Department algorithms for sexually transmitted disease (STD) treatment to detect infection with Neisseria gonorrhoeae and/or Chlamydia trachomatis among women attending antenatal and family planning clinics. Methods. 327 women attending antenatal clinics and 189 attending a family planning clinic in Hlabisa, KwaZulu-Natal, were questioned and examined clinically and microbiologically. Data were used to determine the sensitivity, specificity and predictive values of the algorithm used with a speculum and the algorithm when no speculum was available. Results. Prevalence of infection with N. gonorrhoeae and/or C. trachomatis was high among both pregnant women (18.9%) and those attending the family planning clinic (11.1%). Associations between abnormal symptoms and signs and infection were weak, odds ratios ranging from 1.1 to 5.4. Both algorithms performed poorly, with sensitivity ranging from 42.9% to 70.0%, specificity from 30.7% to 75.6%, and positive predictive values from 17% to 18.8%. Conclusions. Prevalence of infection is high among these women. The algorithms tested perform poorly - most infected women remain untreated and most of those treated are uninfected. Alternative strategies for diagnosis and/or treatment are required.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)900-905
Number of pages6
JournalSouth African Medical Journal
Volume88
Issue number7 SUPPL.
Publication statusPublished - 1998
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Copyright the Author(s). Version archived for private and non-commercial use with the permission of the author/s and according to publisher conditions. For further rights please contact the publisher.

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Value of clinical algorithms to screen for gonococcal and chlamydial infection among women attending antenatal and family planning clinics'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this