Variants of neovascular age-related macular degeneration: type 3 neovascularization (intraretinal neovascularization or retinal angiomatous proliferation)

Adrian T. Fung, K. Bailey Freund

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterpeer-review

Abstract

INTRODUCTION According to the Gass classifi cation of choroidal neovascularization (CNV), neovascular proliferation may occur in two distinct forms (1). In the fi rst, coined “type 1 neovascularization,” the neovascular tissue is confi ned to the sub-retinal pigment epithelial (sub-RPE) space and is usually visible on fl uorescein angiography (FA) as “poorly defi ned” or “occult” leakage. This is the most common form of CNV in age-related macular degeneration (AMD) (2). In contrast, “type 2 neovascularization” refers to neovascular tissue originating in the choroid that gains access to the subretinal space via a breach in the Bruch’s membrane/RPE complex. This is usually associated with “well defi ned” or “classic” leakage on FA. Type 2 neovascularization often occurs in the setting of pathological myopia, choroidal rupture, angioid streaks, and infl ammation (3). The existence of intraretinal neovascularization has been described. In a logical progression from the anatomical classifi cation system proposed by Gass, Freund et al. (4) have described this as “type 3 neovascularization.” This form of neovascularization has distinct demographic, funduscopic, and prognostic features that set it apart from type 1 and type 2 neovascularization.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationAge-related macular degeneration
EditorsJennifer I. Lim
Place of PublicationBoca Raton, FL
PublisherCRC Press, Taylor & Francis Group
Chapter11
Pages148-162
Number of pages15
Edition3rd
ISBN (Electronic)9780429098253
ISBN (Print)9781841849492, 9780367380663
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013
Externally publishedYes

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