Vox naturae: music as human-animal communication in the context of 'animal training' in Ancient Greece and Rome

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstractResearch

Abstract

Plutarch establishes the notion of music as a form of animal communication by asserting that the melodious sounds of certain species of birds are expressions of ‘articulate speech’ (Plut. On the intelligence of animals 972F). The use of music as human-animal communication in the context of ‘animal training’ provides a distinct perspective into the influence of human music on animals in an ancient Greco-Roman context. This paper will present two case studies that emphasise the extensive influence of music in this context. Firstly, Varro records the practice of swineherds training their animals to respond to the sound of a bucina (Varro Rust. 2.4.20), and secondly, a 6th century AD funerary mosaic depicts Orpheus surrounded by various animals, including a leashed mongoose. This image implies a conceptual link between music and ‘animal training’.

Conference

Conference6th Annual MOISA Conference
CountryGreece
CityAthens
Period11/07/1614/07/16

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Animal Communication
Ancient Rome
Ancient Greece
Music
Animals
Sound
Plutarch
Birds
Orpheus

Cite this

@conference{123941d2220d4f1bbea7d43ad24d37c8,
title = "Vox naturae: music as human-animal communication in the context of 'animal training' in Ancient Greece and Rome",
abstract = "Plutarch establishes the notion of music as a form of animal communication by asserting that the melodious sounds of certain species of birds are expressions of ‘articulate speech’ (Plut. On the intelligence of animals 972F). The use of music as human-animal communication in the context of ‘animal training’ provides a distinct perspective into the influence of human music on animals in an ancient Greco-Roman context. This paper will present two case studies that emphasise the extensive influence of music in this context. Firstly, Varro records the practice of swineherds training their animals to respond to the sound of a bucina (Varro Rust. 2.4.20), and secondly, a 6th century AD funerary mosaic depicts Orpheus surrounded by various animals, including a leashed mongoose. This image implies a conceptual link between music and ‘animal training’.",
author = "Rodney Cross",
year = "2016",
language = "English",
note = "6th Annual MOISA Conference : Music and the Animal World in Hellenic and Roman Antiquity ; Conference date: 11-07-2016 Through 14-07-2016",

}

Vox naturae : music as human-animal communication in the context of 'animal training' in Ancient Greece and Rome. / Cross, Rodney.

2016. Abstract from 6th Annual MOISA Conference, Athens, Greece.

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstractResearch

TY - CONF

T1 - Vox naturae

T2 - music as human-animal communication in the context of 'animal training' in Ancient Greece and Rome

AU - Cross, Rodney

PY - 2016

Y1 - 2016

N2 - Plutarch establishes the notion of music as a form of animal communication by asserting that the melodious sounds of certain species of birds are expressions of ‘articulate speech’ (Plut. On the intelligence of animals 972F). The use of music as human-animal communication in the context of ‘animal training’ provides a distinct perspective into the influence of human music on animals in an ancient Greco-Roman context. This paper will present two case studies that emphasise the extensive influence of music in this context. Firstly, Varro records the practice of swineherds training their animals to respond to the sound of a bucina (Varro Rust. 2.4.20), and secondly, a 6th century AD funerary mosaic depicts Orpheus surrounded by various animals, including a leashed mongoose. This image implies a conceptual link between music and ‘animal training’.

AB - Plutarch establishes the notion of music as a form of animal communication by asserting that the melodious sounds of certain species of birds are expressions of ‘articulate speech’ (Plut. On the intelligence of animals 972F). The use of music as human-animal communication in the context of ‘animal training’ provides a distinct perspective into the influence of human music on animals in an ancient Greco-Roman context. This paper will present two case studies that emphasise the extensive influence of music in this context. Firstly, Varro records the practice of swineherds training their animals to respond to the sound of a bucina (Varro Rust. 2.4.20), and secondly, a 6th century AD funerary mosaic depicts Orpheus surrounded by various animals, including a leashed mongoose. This image implies a conceptual link between music and ‘animal training’.

M3 - Abstract

ER -