‘We are history in the making and we are walking together to change things for the better’

Exploring the flows and ripples of learning in a mentoring programme for indigenous young people

Sarah O’Shea, Samantha McMahon, Amy Priestly, Gawaian Bodkin-Andrews, Valerie Harwood

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)
29 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

This article explores the unique mentoring model that the Australian Indigenous Mentoring Experience (AIME) has established to assist Australian Indigenous young people succeed educationally. AIME can be described as a structured educational mentoring programme, which recruits university students to mentor Indigenous high school students. The success of the programme is unequivocal, with the AIME Indigenous mentees completing high school and the transition to further education and employment at higher rates than their non-AIME Indigenous counterparts. This article reports on a study that sought to deeply explore the particular approach to mentoring that AIME adopts. The study drew upon interviews, observations and surveys with AIME staff, mentees and mentors, and the focus in this article is on the surveys completed by the university mentors involved in the programme. Overall, there seems to be a discernible mutual reciprocity inherent in the learning outcomes of this mentoring programme; the mentors are learning along with the mentees. The article seeks to consider how AIME mentors reflect upon their learning in this programme and also how this pedagogic potential has been facilitated.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)59-84
Number of pages26
JournalEducation as Change
Volume20
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

Bibliographical note

Copyright the Author(s) 2016. Version archived for private and non-commercial use with the permission of the author/s and according to publisher conditions. For further rights please contact the publisher.

Keywords

  • Indigenous education
  • Indigenous young people
  • Mentoring
  • Pedagogic flows
  • Youth and learning

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of '‘We are history in the making and we are walking together to change things for the better’: Exploring the flows and ripples of learning in a mentoring programme for indigenous young people'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this