We look after our own mob: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander experiences of autism

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    Abstract

    We know virtually nothing about how autism is understood by, and how autistic children, young people and adults are supported in, culturally and linguistically diverse communities. This includes Australia’s own First Peoples: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities. This absence of research leaves a lack of understanding of how these communities across Australia perceive autism, the services and supports that they are currently being offered and the services – from the early years and into adulthood – from which they might benefit the most in the future. This Report, commissioned by Positive Partnerships and supported by First Peoples Disability Network, sought to change that. It is the first research on autism in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities. As such, it provides a vital starting point for understanding the needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander autistic children and those who care for them. We conducted the research by listening directly to the first-hand experiences of 12 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families with a child on the autism spectrum, that have previously not been heard in autism research and, critically, identify key areas for future investigation.
    Original languageEnglish
    Place of PublicationSydney
    PublisherMacquarie University
    Commissioning bodyAutism Spectrum Australia (ASPECT)
    Number of pages60
    ISBN (Print)9780646803944
    Publication statusPublished - 2019

    Bibliographical note

    Version archived for private and non-commercial use with the permission of the author/s and according to publisher conditions. For further rights please contact the publisher.

    Keywords

    • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples
    • Autism Spectrum Disorder

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