Weight stigmatization and disordered eating in obese women: the mediating effects of self-esteem and fear of negative appearance evaluation

C. A. Almenara, A. Aimé*, C. Maïano, A. Ejova, G. Guèvremont, C. Bournival, M. M. Ricard

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: The aim of this study is to examine whether self-esteem and fear of negative appearance evaluation are significant mediators in the association between weight-related self-devaluation and disordered eating. Method: A sample of obese Canadian women (N = 111, M age = 40.9, SD = 10.2) completed the Weight Self-Stigma Questionnaire (WSSQ), the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES), the Fear of Negative Appearance Evaluation Scale (FNAES), and the Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire (EDE-Q). Results: Self-esteem mediated the relationship between weight-related self-devaluation and restraint and weight concerns, whereas fear of negative appearance evaluation mediated the relationship with weight, shape and eating concerns. Conclusion: Since, for obese women, self-esteem and fear of negative appearance evaluation are likely to maintain disordered eating, they should be more frequently taken into consideration by researchers, health professionals and public policy stakeholders.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)155-162
Number of pages8
JournalRevue Europeenne de Psychologie Appliquee
Volume67
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2017
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • obesity
  • self-stigmatization
  • disordered eating
  • self-esteem
  • fear of negative appearance evaluation

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