What do radiology incident reports reveal about in-hospital communication processes and the use of health information technology?

Michael J. Stewart*, Andrew Georgiou, Antonia Hordern, Marion Dimigen, Johanna I. Westbrook

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding contribution

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: There has been recent rapid growth in the use of medical imaging leading to concerns about an increase in unnecessary investigations, patient exposure to radiation, and incorrect diagnoses. Incident reporting systems provide a portal for staff to catalogue adverse events which occur within a hospital or department. Analysing incident reports can reveal trends and provide guidance for quality improvement efforts. Methods: Classification of medical imaging related-incidents from a major teaching hospital in Sydney, Australia using WHO International Classification for Patient Safety (ICPS) taxonomy. All incidents with radiology identified as incident location (n=219) were extracted. Incidents were from January 2005 to October 2011. Two researchers independently cleaned the data set. One researcher then applied the ICPS to free text incident reports. Results: 216 unique incidents were extracted. 15 incidents were unable to be classified using the ICPS. 8 incidents were classified twice, resulting in 209 coded incidents. Communication breakdown was a contributing factor in 49% (103/209) of incidents reported. 147 of the 209 incidents were associated with activities associated with data collection, storage or retrieval of electronic information. Health information technology (HIT) systems were mentioned explicitly in 10% of incidents, indicating some contribution to the error. Conclusions: Communication breakdown and HIT systems are contributors to error, and should be addressed. HIT systems need to be monitored and flaws addressed to ensure quality care.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationHealth Informatics: Building a Healthcare Future Through Trusted Information - Selected Papers from the 20th Australian National Health Informatics Conference, HIC 2012
EditorsAnthony J. Maeder, Fernando J. Martin-Sanchez
Place of PublicationSydney, NSW, Australia
PublisherIOS Press
Pages213-218
Number of pages6
Volume178
ISBN (Electronic)9781614990772
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012
Externally publishedYes
Event20th Australian National Health Informatics Conference, HIC 2012 - Sydney, NSW, Australia
Duration: 30 Jul 20122 Aug 2012

Publication series

NameStudies in health technology and informatics
PublisherIOS Press
ISSN (Print)0926-9630
ISSN (Electronic)0926-9630

Other

Other20th Australian National Health Informatics Conference, HIC 2012
CountryAustralia
CitySydney, NSW
Period30/07/122/08/12

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  • Cite this

    Stewart, M. J., Georgiou, A., Hordern, A., Dimigen, M., & Westbrook, J. I. (2012). What do radiology incident reports reveal about in-hospital communication processes and the use of health information technology? In A. J. Maeder, & F. J. Martin-Sanchez (Eds.), Health Informatics: Building a Healthcare Future Through Trusted Information - Selected Papers from the 20th Australian National Health Informatics Conference, HIC 2012 (Vol. 178, pp. 213-218). (Studies in health technology and informatics). Sydney, NSW, Australia: IOS Press. https://doi.org/10.3233/978-1-61499-078-9-213