What medical students value from their teachers.

Maria Theresa Ho*, Massimiliano Tani

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

As Australian medical educators become more accustomed to the increasing pressures imposed upon them, there is a risk that the traditional educational relationship between a student and his or her teacher is replaced by a pure transactional relationship between a customer and his or her supplier. A large sample of medical students surveyed revealed that medical students seem to value directed rather than independent learning. New approaches to teaching, such as being innovative or entertaining, as well as facilitating participation, do not appear to be very important to medical students. Medical students do not seem to have strong preferences when it comes to assessment, contradicting some of the fundamental suggestions of the recent educational literature, in which assessment is often viewed as a key element in the formation and the direction of learning. The fact that medical students seem to reject many of the paradigms of the psychology-based educational literature, at least based on the large sample surveyed at the University of New South Wales, suggests that caution should be used in the development of training programs for teachers in medical faculties, and that learning and teaching should ensure that students' expectations and teachers' training do not mismatch.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)358-361
Number of pages4
JournalAustralian health review : a publication of the Australian Hospital Association
Volume31
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2007

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