What 'survivorship' means to melanoma survivors at high or moderate risk of developing new primary disease

Nadine Kasparian, Bettina Meiser, Phyllis N. Butow, Jordana McLoone, Kristine Barlow-Stewart, Graham Mann, Scott W. Menzies

Research output: Contribution to journalMeeting abstract

Abstract

BACKGROUND/PURPOSE: Australians with multiple
previous melanomas, or a previous melanoma and dysplastic
nevus syndrome, are at 10–20 times greater risk
of developing melanoma than the general population.
However, virtually nothing is known about psychosocial
outcomes for these groups. METHODS: A crosssectional
survey was implemented to determine the
prevalence and correlates of psychosocial and behavioural
adaptation amongst melanoma survivors at high
(Group 1) or moderate (Group 2) risk of developing
new primary disease. Recruitment occurred via the
High Risk Clinic of the Sydney Melanoma Diagnostic
Centre (Group 1) and the Melanoma Institute of Australia
(Group 2), the world’s largest clinical service
dedicated to melanoma. RESULTS: The sample comprised
286 melanoma survivors (57% high risk, 58%
men, mean age: 59.1 years). Most participants (71%)
reported levels of fear of cancer recurrence warranting
clinical assessment, and many (54% high risk, 65%
moderate risk) reported experiencing anxiety before
dermatological appointments. Most participants believed
it would be ‘very’ or ‘extremely’ useful to receive
information and supportive care at diagnosis
(89%), during treatment (86%), and follow-up care
(85%). Sizeable proportions of participants reported
‘over-screening’ (16% high risk, 24% moderate risk)
or ‘under-screening’ (20% high risk, 24% moderate
risk) for melanoma. A path analysis was used to
determine the factors that influenced psychological adaptation.
CONCLUSIONS: Participants demonstrated
a striking need for information and support at all stages
of their melanoma care. These findings have been used
to inform the development and trial of a psychoeducational
intervention tailored to meet the supportive
care needs of melanoma survivors at high risk of developing
new primary disease. Moreover, the results
demonstrate a clear demand for psychological support
to be part of routine clinical care for melanoma.
Research Implications: These findings have been used to
inform the development and trial of a psycho-educational
intervention tailored to meet the supportive care needs of
melanoma survivors at high risk of developing new primary
disease.
Practice Implications: Moreover, the results demonstrate
a clear demand for psychological support to be part of routine
clinical care for melanoma.
Original languageEnglish
Article numberP2-166
Pages (from-to)316-317
Number of pages2
JournalPsycho-Oncology
Volume24
Issue numberS2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2015
Externally publishedYes
EventAbstracts of the 2015 World Congress of Psycho-Oncology (a joint conference of the International Psycho-Oncology Societyand the American Psychosocial Oncology Society) - Washington, United States
Duration: 28 Jul 20151 Aug 2015

Cite this

Kasparian, N., Meiser, B., Butow, P. N., McLoone, J., Barlow-Stewart, K., Mann, G., & Menzies, S. W. (2015). What 'survivorship' means to melanoma survivors at high or moderate risk of developing new primary disease. Psycho-Oncology, 24(S2), 316-317. [P2-166]. https://doi.org/10.1002/pon.3874