Whither justice for former child soldiers?: complex perpetrators and the International Criminal Court

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstractResearch

Abstract

The International Criminal Court (ICC) was introduced to provide global leadership and rise above nationalistic concerns when it came to the pursuit of justice in highly complex situations and investigations. However, with its selective prosecutorial policies and the focus on the ‘worst of the worst’ of alleged perpetrators, the Court may not have anticipated, and may not be prepared, to deal with instances of complex perpetrators.
Dominic Ongwen, whose trial is currently underway before the court is one such example. Dominic Ongwen is charged with a host of crimes against humanity and war crimes, focusing on acts of brutality against civilian populations in Uganda, and his role as a Commander within the Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA). Indeed some of the worst violence committed by the LRA has been attributed to Ongwen’s leadership. Yet this is not the whole picture. Dominic Ongwen has been part of the LRA for 25 years, having been abducted and forcibly recruited at a young age and having spent much of his childhood as a child soldier. He thus presents a complex case of a victim-perpetrator and confronting questions about what, precisely, the role of international criminal justice is in such cases.
This paper will explore some of the confronting questions that this case poses for the ICC, in terms of framing criminal responsibility, moral culpability, notions of justice and indeed, the very purpose of the Court.

Conference

ConferenceANZSIL Annual Conference
CountryAustralia
CityCanberra
Period29/06/171/07/17

Fingerprint

International Criminal Court
soldier
military
justice
leadership
civilian population
war crime
Uganda
childhood
offense
violence
responsibility

Keywords

  • child soldiers
  • children participating in armed conflict
  • armed conflict
  • international criminal court
  • international criminal justice
  • complex perpetrators
  • victims

Cite this

Daft, S. (2017). Whither justice for former child soldiers? complex perpetrators and the International Criminal Court. 24. Abstract from ANZSIL Annual Conference, Canberra , Australia.
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abstract = "The International Criminal Court (ICC) was introduced to provide global leadership and rise above nationalistic concerns when it came to the pursuit of justice in highly complex situations and investigations. However, with its selective prosecutorial policies and the focus on the ‘worst of the worst’ of alleged perpetrators, the Court may not have anticipated, and may not be prepared, to deal with instances of complex perpetrators.Dominic Ongwen, whose trial is currently underway before the court is one such example. Dominic Ongwen is charged with a host of crimes against humanity and war crimes, focusing on acts of brutality against civilian populations in Uganda, and his role as a Commander within the Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA). Indeed some of the worst violence committed by the LRA has been attributed to Ongwen’s leadership. Yet this is not the whole picture. Dominic Ongwen has been part of the LRA for 25 years, having been abducted and forcibly recruited at a young age and having spent much of his childhood as a child soldier. He thus presents a complex case of a victim-perpetrator and confronting questions about what, precisely, the role of international criminal justice is in such cases.This paper will explore some of the confronting questions that this case poses for the ICC, in terms of framing criminal responsibility, moral culpability, notions of justice and indeed, the very purpose of the Court.",
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author = "Shireen Daft",
year = "2017",
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note = "ANZSIL Annual Conference : Sustaining the International Legal Order in an Era of Rising Nationalism ; Conference date: 29-06-2017 Through 01-07-2017",

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Daft, S 2017, 'Whither justice for former child soldiers? complex perpetrators and the International Criminal Court' ANZSIL Annual Conference, Canberra , Australia, 29/06/17 - 1/07/17, pp. 24.

Whither justice for former child soldiers? complex perpetrators and the International Criminal Court. / Daft, Shireen.

2017. 24 Abstract from ANZSIL Annual Conference, Canberra , Australia.

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstractResearch

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Daft S. Whither justice for former child soldiers? complex perpetrators and the International Criminal Court. 2017. Abstract from ANZSIL Annual Conference, Canberra , Australia.