Who's talking, who's listening: exploring social media use by community groups using social network analysis

Wayne Williamson, Kristian Ruming*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding contributionpeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Community participation in planning is generally considered crucial for the delivery of positive outcomes; however, the network structures of stakeholders such as community groups are not widely understood. This paper explores the use of social media, specifically Twitter, by five community groups. In the context of this study, community groups are self-created and organized groups of citizens that form to oppose a proposal to amend planning controls for a specific site. Utilizing the research technique of Social Network Analysis (SNA), this paper seeks to visualize the community group networks, as well as understand the connectedness and clustering of the networks. For the five community groups investigated, it was found that they are led by a small number of active people, which do not attract large numbers of friends and followers on Twitter and key stakeholders play a passive listening role in the networks.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of CUPUM 2015
Subtitle of host publicationThe 14th International Conference on Computers in Urban Planning and Urban Management : Planning Support Systems and Smart Cities
PublisherCUPUM
Pages1-22
Number of pages22
ISBN (Print)9780692474341
Publication statusPublished - 2015
Event14th International Conference on Computers in Urban Planning and Urban Management: Planning Support Systems and Smart Cities - Cambridge, United States
Duration: 7 Jul 201510 Jul 2015

Other

Other14th International Conference on Computers in Urban Planning and Urban Management
Abbreviated titleCUPUM 2015
CountryUnited States
CityCambridge
Period7/07/1510/07/15

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