Wideband profiles of stimulus-frequency otoacoustic emissions in humans

James B. Dewey, Sumitrajit Dhar

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding contribution

Abstract

Behavioral pure-tone hearing thresholds and stimulus-frequency otoacoustic emissions (SFOAEs) were measured with a high frequency resolution from 0.5-20 kHz in 15 female participants. Stimuli were calibrated in terms of forward pressure level (FPL). SFOAE responses to 36 dB FPL probes were largest near 1 kHz and declined above 8-10 kHz, though were still measurable at frequencies approaching 16 kHz in some ears. SFOAEs typically dropped in amplitude at a frequency that was roughly one octave below the "corner" frequency of the audiogram, and one-third to one-half of an octave below the frequency where thresholds departed from highly sensitive hearing. High-frequency SFOAE responses are likely limited by a reduction in the efficiency of the underlying generation mechanism and/or a diminished region of generation as the stimulus-driven excitation approaches the basal-most portion of the cochlea.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationMechanics of hearing
Subtitle of host publicationprotein to perception : proceedings of the 12th International Workshop on the Mechanics of Hearing
EditorsK. Domenica Karavitaki, David P. Corey
Place of PublicationMelville, NY
PublisherAmerican Institute of Physics
Pages090018-1-090018-5
Number of pages5
Volume1703
ISBN (Electronic)9780735413504
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 31 Dec 2015
Externally publishedYes
Event12th International Workshop on the Mechanics of Hearing: Protein to Perception - Cape Sounio, Greece
Duration: 23 Jun 201429 Jun 2014

Publication series

NameAIP Conference Proceedings
PublisherAMER INST PHYSICS
Volume1703
ISSN (Print)0094-243X

Other

Other12th International Workshop on the Mechanics of Hearing: Protein to Perception
CountryGreece
CityCape Sounio
Period23/06/1429/06/14

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