Women and public life in imperial Asia Minor: Hellenistic tradition and Augustan ideology

R. A. Kearsley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Women frequently appear with titles of public office in inscriptions of Roman Asia Minor. These titles are a meaningful sign of the role of women as office-bearers and not necessarily the result of sharing a position with a male relative. The late 1st century BC-early 1st century AD was particularly important as a formative period. The article discusses the social context of women office-bearers in Asia Minor under the headings: Queens in Bosporus and Asia Minor; Livia, femina princes; Livia imatatio in the East; Wealthy Women in Public Life during the 2nd and 3rd centuries AD.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)98-121
Number of pages24
JournalAncient West and East
Volume4
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 2005

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