Working memory training to improve speech perception in noise across languages

Erin M. Ingvalson*, Sumitrajit Dhar, Patrick C.M. Wong, Hanjun Liu

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Working memory capacity has been linked to performance on many higher cognitive tasks, including the ability to perceive speech in noise. Current efforts to train working memory have demonstrated that working memory performance can be improved, suggesting that working memory training may lead to improved speech perception in noise. A further advantage of working memory training to improve speech perception in noise is that working memory training materials are often simple, such as letters or digits, making them easily translatable across languages. The current effort tested the hypothesis that working memory training would be associated with improved speech perception in noise and that materials would easily translate across languages. Native Mandarin Chinese and native English speakers completed ten days of reversed digit span training. Reading span and speech perception in noise both significantly improved following training, whereas untrained controls showed no gains. These data suggest that working memory training may be used to improve listeners' speech perception in noise and that the materials may be quickly adapted to a wide variety of listeners.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3477-3486
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of the Acoustical Society of America
Volume137
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jun 2015
Externally publishedYes

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