Worm infestations and development of autoimmunity in children: the ABIS study

Johnny Ludvigsson, Michael P. Jones, Åshild Faresjö

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Worm infestations influence the immune system and may therefore decrease the risk for autoimmune diseases. The aim of the study was to determine whether children who have developed autoimmune disease were less likely to have had worm infestations in childhood. The ABIS-study is a prospective population-based cohort study of children born in southeast Sweden 1997/99. 17.055 children participated. As of June 2014 116 individuals had developed Type 1 diabetes, 181 celiac disease, and 53 Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis. The parents answered questions on worm infestations when the children were 1, 5 and 8 years of age. The ABIS registry was connected to the National Registry of Drug Prescriptions, and national registries for diagnosis of the studied diseases. We found no differences in incidence of worm infestations at 1, 5 or 8 years of age between children who developed autoimmune disease(s) or healthy controls. At 8 years in total 20.0% of the general child population had experienced a worm infestation; children who developed Type 1 diabetes, 21,3%, celiac disease 19,5% and JRA 18,8%. There was no difference in prescriptions of drugs for treatment of worm infestations between those who had and who had not developed Type 1 diabetes, celiac disease, Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis. We found no associations indicating that worm infestations in childhood does not play a role in the development of autoimmune diseases in Sweden.

LanguageEnglish
Article numbere0173988
Pages1-6
Number of pages6
JournalPLoS ONE
Volume12
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 23 Mar 2017

Fingerprint

autoimmunity
Autoimmunity
autoimmune diseases
Autoimmune Diseases
celiac disease
insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus
Celiac Disease
Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus
Medical problems
Registries
rheumatoid arthritis
Juvenile Arthritis
Sweden
childhood
Drug Prescriptions
Prescription Drugs
disease diagnosis
cohort studies
Immune system
Population

Bibliographical note

Copyright the Author(s) 2017. Version archived for private and non-commercial use with the permission of the author/s and according to publisher conditions. For further rights please contact the publisher.

Cite this

Ludvigsson, Johnny ; Jones, Michael P. ; Faresjö, Åshild. / Worm infestations and development of autoimmunity in children : the ABIS study. In: PLoS ONE. 2017 ; Vol. 12, No. 3. pp. 1-6.
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Worm infestations and development of autoimmunity in children : the ABIS study. / Ludvigsson, Johnny; Jones, Michael P.; Faresjö, Åshild.

In: PLoS ONE, Vol. 12, No. 3, e0173988, 23.03.2017, p. 1-6.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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