Yeast systems biology: modelling the winemaker's art

Anthony R. Borneman, Paul J. Chambers, Isak S. Pretorius

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Yeast research represents an important nexus between fundamental and applied research. Just as fundamental yeast research transitioned from classical, reductionist strategies to whole-genome techniques, whole-genome studies are advancing to the next level of biological research, referred to as systems biology. Industries that rely on high-performing yeast, such as the wine industry, are therefore poised to reap the many benefits that systems biology can provide. This includes the promise of strain development at speeds and costs which are unobtainable using current techniques. This article reviews the current state of whole-genome techniques available to yeast researchers and outlines how these processes can be used to obtain 'systems-level' information to provide insights into winemaking.

LanguageEnglish
Pages349-355
Number of pages7
JournalTrends in Biotechnology
Volume25
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2007
Externally publishedYes

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Systems Biology
Art
Yeast
Yeasts
Genes
Genome
Research
Industry
Wine
Information Systems
Research Personnel
Costs and Cost Analysis
Costs

Cite this

Borneman, Anthony R. ; Chambers, Paul J. ; Pretorius, Isak S. / Yeast systems biology : modelling the winemaker's art. In: Trends in Biotechnology. 2007 ; Vol. 25, No. 8. pp. 349-355.
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Yeast systems biology : modelling the winemaker's art. / Borneman, Anthony R.; Chambers, Paul J.; Pretorius, Isak S.

In: Trends in Biotechnology, Vol. 25, No. 8, 08.2007, p. 349-355.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articleResearchpeer-review

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