You say tomato, I say tomahto, let's call the whole thing off: the Chicago School of Law and Economics comes to Japan

Craig Freedman, Luke Nottage

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding contributionpeer-review

Abstract

Mark Ramseyer has been a leading force in bringing to bear the methods of Law and Economics to a continuing analysis of the Japanese legal and economic system. He has deliberately assumed an iconoclastic position in debunking a number of widely held beliefs about Japan. In this paper we analyse Ramseyer’s contribution and conclude that he has too frequently let ideological objectives interfere with what should be cool headed analysis. While asking many of the right questions he unfortunately has let a priori assumptions determine his answers.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationEssays in Heterodox Economics
Subtitle of host publicationproceedings, refereed papers
EditorsPeter Kriesler, Michael Johnson, John Lodewijks
Place of PublicationSydney, Australia
PublisherUniversity of New South Wales
Pages129-154
Number of pages26
ISBN (Print)9780733424175
Publication statusPublished - 2006
EventAustralian society of heterodox economists conference (5th : 2006) - Sydney
Duration: 11 Dec 200612 Dec 2006

Conference

ConferenceAustralian society of heterodox economists conference (5th : 2006)
CitySydney
Period11/12/0612/12/06

Keywords

  • Ramseyer
  • Japan
  • law and economics

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