Young children's intuitive models of multiplication and division

Joanne Mulligan, Michael Mitchelmore

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding contribution

    Abstract

    60 female students were observed four times during Grades 2 and 3 as they solved the same set of 24 multiplication and division problems with a wide variety of semantic structures. Students used three main intuitive models for both multiplication and division problems: direct counting, repeated addition and multiplication operations with a fourth model, repeated subtraction occurring only in division problems. The most popular model was repeated addition. Children's intuitive understanding of multiplication and division developed largely as a result of their recognising the . equal group structure common to all multiplicative structures. The findings are in contrast to those of Fischbein et al. (1985).
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationProceedings of the 18th annual conference of the Mathematics Education Reserach Group of Australasia
    EditorsB. Atweh, S. Flavell
    Place of PublicationDarwin
    PublisherMathematics Education Research Group of Australasia
    Pages427-433
    Number of pages7
    Publication statusPublished - 1995

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    Mulligan, J., & Mitchelmore, M. (1995). Young children's intuitive models of multiplication and division. In B. Atweh, & S. Flavell (Eds.), Proceedings of the 18th annual conference of the Mathematics Education Reserach Group of Australasia (pp. 427-433). Darwin: Mathematics Education Research Group of Australasia.